The ORS Int. is the official adjudicator of ocean rowing records for Guinness World Records

 

 

DEFINITION OF THE AROUND THE WORLD WEST-EAST ROW

 



As for today, there have been four persons, who attempted to row across the Southern Ocean W-E or Around-the-World on the Southern Ocean from west to east - Joseph LeGuen, Jim Shekhdar, Colin Yeates and Oliver Hicks (See the stats below)
Currently one more person, Fedor Konyukhov is ready to start his row from NZ to Cape Horn, as the first leg of his intended Around-the-World row. And shortly Oliver Hicks will make his second attempt to row Around-the-World on Southern Ocean W-E.

In order to clarify which row classifies for "Around-the-World Row" and to define the rules, the ORS Int. have adopted the rules of The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) for free balloon flights, recognizing that the climatological constraints are similar in both ocean rowing and in free balloon flights. Due to meteorological laws, balloon flying routes are dependent on the prevailing winds, and ocean rowing routes - on the prevailing winds and currents. The eastbound jetstream and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Southern Hemisphere are examples of such winds and currents.

Thus,
when an ocean rowboat crosses all longitudes, covers a distance which is at least half that of the circumference of the equator, i.e. aprox. 20 000 km / 10 800 nautical miles (as the crow flies), eventually crossing the same longitude where it started, then it is considered an Around The World Row. The row can be done with stops or without stops, although the primary aim has to be to go without stops (similar to a Pacific E-W row), though we recognize that a non-stop row is hardly achievable due to seasonal climotological constrains at these latitudes and the length of the distance which can't be covered in one navigational season.
 
We will not use the unique expression circumnavigation in "around-the-world-row" definition. Different to "human-powered" expeditions, that presume both rowing oceans and surface journeys, we are not enforcing an antipodal requirement by the around-the-world row definition, nor does it expect rowers to cross the equator, recognizing the dependence on the climatological constraints.

 

South Pacific / Southern Ocean W-E Solo Incomplete

 

NO

FIRST
NAME

SURNAME

COUNTRY

BOAT

MILES

DEPART

END OF ROW

DAYS

FROM
                   

1

Joseph Le Guen

France

www.Keepitblue.com 1770

February 3 2000

April 2 2000

59

Wellington, New Zealand

2 Jim Shekhdar

GB

Hornette

50

October 16 2003

October 16 2003

1

        Bluff, New Zealand

 3 Jim Shekhdar

GB

Hornette

?

November 04 2003

November 18 2003

14

        Bluff, New Zealand

4 Colin Yeates GB Charlie Rossiter ?

January 2 2006

January 3 2006 1 Port Stanley, Falklands Islands
5 Colin Yeates GB Charlie Rossiter ?

February 16 2006

February 18 2006 2 Port Stanley, Falklands Islands

 

 

Initially Oliver Hicks attempted to row the South Pacific W-E,
but due to unfavorable weather conditions had to change his destination.
See his row listed as Completed under section
Tasman Sea Rows  

 

FIRST
NAME

SURNAME

COUNTRY

BOAT

MILES

DEPART

END OF ROW

DAYS

FROM

TO

  Oliver Hicks GB

Flying Carrot

 

Jan 23 2009 Apr 28 2009 95 days

Fisher's Point of Recherche Bay, Tasmania

Stewart Island/Rakiura, NZ